Browsing All posts tagged under »lying in court«

Michael Honeycutt, TCEQ Toxicology Director, Lies under Oath

September 12, 2020

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Michael Honeycutt, Ph.D., whom this post tersely exposes, is the director of toxicology of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). He is also the current chairman of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Boards but, amid some controversy concerning his ethics, reportedly will not be seeking reappointment when his term ends next month. Readers […]

Michael Honeycutt, EPA Top Science Adviser, Lies under Oath

August 24, 2020

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Michael Honeycutt, Ph.D., whom this post tersely exposes, is the chairman of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Boards and the director of toxicology of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Readers may consult “What TCEQ Exec L’Oreal Stepney Would Ask Michael Honeycutt if She Cared Whether the Directors Her Agency Employed Were Unscrupulous […]

Retracting False Allegations to the Court

December 3, 2014

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Apologies are offered upfront to the reader expecting a tutorial on how to recant false testimony (though here is an explication about how a restraining order may be dismissed by a petitioner who has reconsidered). The reason this post must disappoint is that to withdraw false allegations would be to confess to lying to the court and would, as […]

PERJURY: BS-ing the Court, the Frequency of False Allegations, and the Fraudulent Abuse of the Civil Restraining Order

March 15, 2014

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In the last post, I discussed how lying is generally gotten away with beneath the radar. What people who’ve blessedly had no personal experience with fraudulent abuse of legal process fail to grasp is (1) there’s no incentive to expose untruths except (perhaps) when they’re used to frame people for crimes for which they stand […]

The Truth about the Frequency of False Allegations ISN’T to Be Found in Statistics: On How Fraudulent Abuse of Civil Restraining Orders Escapes Recognition

March 12, 2014

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I’ve earnestly and objectively examined posited rates of false allegations in recent months, because statistics and analytics are what we soonest regard as estimates of the truth. It’s typical of writers hostile to the notion that false allegations are rampant, as well as of legal analysts and social scientists, to cite such rates, particularly official […]